Ross River fever mosquito warning for Kangaroo Island, South Australia residents

Kangaroo Island and SA residents are being warned to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes after an increase of Ross River fever cases across South Australia.

Western Cove resident Fleur Peters is keen to get the word out since being diagnosed in recent weeks and suffering from the debilitating symptoms.

She said she knows of at least two other KI residents with symptoms yet to be diagnosed and listed several people who have contracted the disease on KI over the years.

Across SA, four cases of Ross River virus infection were notified in mid January in one male and three females, with a median age of 43 years.

There have been nine cases of Ross River virus infection notified year-to-date compared to no cases for the same period last year.

The latest can be found SA Health's Notifiable disease summary.

SA Health says South Australians should cover up against mosquito bites to prevent contracting vector borne diseases such as Ross River virus infection.

That itchy mosquito bite is a nuisance and could result in something much more harmful like Ross River or Barmah Forest virus infections which have symptoms such as fever, rash, joint and muscle pain, fatigue and a general feeling of being unwell.

Health authorities meanwhile last month issued a Ross River fever advisory warning for anyone living in, or travelling to north west Victoria.

People have been warned to avoid mosquito bites by using measures such as mosquito repellent containing picaridin or DEET.

Authorities also advise wearing long, loose fitting clothing outside and making sure accommodation is properly fitted with mosquito nets or screens.

The Victorian warning comes after Ross River virus was detected in mosquitoes in urban Mildura.

The virus can cause symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness, headache, fever, rash, fatigue.

"The best way to protect against mosquito-borne disease is to prevent being bitten," a SA Health spokesperson said.

It's also important to 'Fight the Bite' by covering up with long, loose fitting and light-coloured clothing, using an insect repellent containing DEET or picaridin, stopping mosquitoes coming indoors and cleaning up water around the home to prevent breeding.

It is important that people remain vigilant in protecting themselves against mosquito bites particularly as they may be spending more time outdoors during summer.

For more information visit SA Health's fight the bite

If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito

Dalai Lama